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Category Archives: Art In The Garden

Photography at Blake

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Filed under: Art In The Garden

Artist and Kensington resident,  Geoffery Ansel Agrons, photographs in the Blake Garden regularly. These are a few of his stunning images. We are very thankful that he shares them with us.



CAA sculpture students in the C-W-Z

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Filed under: Art In The Garden

In late April, artist Zach Pine worked with California College of the Arts sculpture students in the Create with Nature Zone building temporary sculpture with materials provided by the garden.



Bromeliads (and more)

Posted on by Surprise Highway

After another day of work by work-study student, Anastasia and volunteer Keith, the greenhouse interior has become aesthetically richer. They continued to attach bromeliads and orchids to some pruned branches and added found sandstone pavers around the sculptural elements.



Tunnel (Part 3)

Posted on by Surprise Highway
The bamboo tunnel is nearing completion. While two of our volunteers, Peter S. and Peter K., were working, some local kids gave it a try. [media id=17 width=320 height=240]

Drawing & Compostion Class visits Blake

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Students from Jenny Braymen's Drawing and Composition Class from Berkeley City College Art Program came to the garden on Sept 29th to draw in the field. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="400" caption="Drawing on the event lawn"][/caption]

Water Journey

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Last year's beloved work-study student from Landscape Architecture Dept., Deedee Min told us she was inspired by our concern about water use and efforts to limit it's use. We included her video made in Prof. Chip Sullivan's drawing class LAEP Studio 103. [media id=14 width=320 height=240] Deedee's statement: Water is very important in our lives but it is often overlooked. For example, double checking if the faucet is completely tightened and turning off the water while you brush your teeth or soaping the dishes will lessen the unnecessary water consumption. Just by being more aware of the water and its journey--as portrayed in the video, which shows awareness of how rain water can be reused for irrigation--the amount of water we save as a community will increase dramatically.

Orinda Plein Air Painters at Blake

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Filed under: Art In The Garden

Orinda Plein air painters from Orinda Parks and Recreation came for their periodic visit and to take advantage of the benefits of the spring rain. The flowers in the vegetable and flower garden are in full bloom and are stunning.



Art-Architist C: Acacia

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Filed under: Art In The Garden

Artists Peter Suchecki and Rusty Lamer continue to create art objects in the garden. This time using stripped bark from Acacia baileyana trees that were taken down by another group project.  By stripping the bark, soaking the strips in the creek and then tying the pliable pieces together they formed a 280' rope that they then coiled around two ironwood trees on the ridge creating a screen that highlights the fantastic view of the Golden Gate. 



Art-Architist B: Bamboo

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Filed under: Art In The Garden, Video
On April 24th, artists Peter Suchecki and Rusty Lamer  continued  their series of ephemeral garden projects. They began the day by gathering golden & timber bamboo and wetland mud from the Australian Hollow.  They fashioned a basket catapult launcher made of  the bamboo and ties made with pliable  bark from newly cut acacia trees.The catapult became the drawing  tool  that delivered mud and bamboo marks onto the empty canvas of the aging  parking structure. The performative drawing puzzled and delighted garden visitors. Laughs and chuckles fueled the artists to work the long 7 hour day. [nggallery id=81] Video shot by Lauri Twitchell: [media id=12 width=480 height=360]

Art-Architist A: Equisetum

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Filed under: Art In The Garden

Artist Peter Suchecki and Architist Rusty Lamer (MLA UCB 2008) have started a series of art pieces here at the garden. The projects are a response to the site and are informed by the availabilty of materials & time. This untitled piece is made of a plentiful and interesting material, Equisetum telmateia, which is a somewhat invasive horsetail fern that sprouted up in the creek area after the invasive species algerian ivy and blackberries were removed. The horsetail was woven onto the 9 ft fence at the entrance to the garden.