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Category Archives: Art In The Garden

Crestmont Kindergarten visits Blake

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Filed under: Art In The Garden, Education,

Kindergarten students from Crestmont Elementary School in  Richmond  taught by teacher Robin Hart-Poindexter came to the garden for a  tour on Wednesday.  Our tour included  investigating the garden with the five senses, looking at the redwood trees and the wetland and talking about habitats and life cycles . We also spent some time in the Create with Nature zone building objects from  natural materials from the garden . The students worked collaboratively and individually building small teepees, shelters, sculpture and musical instruments which were demonstrated, time machines, thrones, and pathways. Each student or student group described the materials used, the process and the title of their works.  Students were particularly interested in connections and attachments such as tying, wedging, inserting.



Berkeley HS photo students at Blake

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Filed under: Art In The Garden, Education,

Berkeley High School students from Lucinda Daly's photo class came to the garden in October, and took some stunning photos. Concurrently the U.C.Landscape Architecture Undergraduate students had their temporary installations  up in the garden from the Revealing the Landscape project.



New Botanicals

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Filed under: Art In The Garden,

Local photographer, Liz Bordow has shared her photos of flowers from Blake  garden: Lunaria, Allium, Anemone and Francoa.



Student Photos a Blake Garden

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Filed under: Art In The Garden,

Kevin Utschig, a student from David Goldberg's summer U.C.Landscape Photography class shared with us some beautiful  shots of the garden.



Acacia fence Part 1

We continue to develop the wetland and the hillside above. The hillside was planted with Acacia baileyana to prevent erosion. Because it is  invasive if allowed to flower and go to seed, we decided to shrub it and replace it gradually with native grasses and succulents that are also good for erosion control. By cutting it back hard periodically it provided us with some interesting material to replace an aging bamboo and twine fence that we put around the perimeter of the wetland to protect newly planted native wetland species. Volunteers and students stripped the acacia branches, developed some mock ups for the fence design and are installing the  the branches  around the wetland. The branches are tied together with bark stripped from the branches and then soaked in water to become more pliable. This is another example of regenerative design that we use in the garden.



Early summer in the garden

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Filed under: Art In The Garden,

It's early summer in the garden and photographer Geoffery Ansel Agrons has returned to find many interesting subjects.



Bouquets to Art

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The San Francisco Garden Club asked Garden manager, Lauri Twitchell and another former Master of Landscape Architecture Grad, Holly Selvig to represent them in the annual Bouquets to Art Event at the de Young museum. We chose five pieces within the museums collection to respond to in flowers. We got "Rubbing from the Ball Court", an image from a granite wall from Chichen Itza depicting a soccer like game where the loser loses his head at the end of the match. Green, Purple & Red foliage was collected from the garden. It is early in the season so the red lilies, red roses and red rununculus were purchased. The vase was carved granite. Gallery statement: Our floral piece is inspired by the materiality of the event represented in the "Rubbing from the Ball Court". The stylized nature of the stone carving tempers the extreme drama of the event: the beheading of the loser of the ball game. We tried to capture that drama in color, form, and material, and at the same time, also honor the brutal cultural tradition.



Prof. Chip Sullivan presentation

Posted on by Surprise Highway
Filed under: Art In The Garden, Education,

UC Berkeley Dept. of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning professor, Chip Sullivan, presented some of his books and optical devices to visitors from the McDowell Artists Colony. After Chip's presentation, artist Rusty Lamer showed the group his portable Camera Obscura.



More Revealing the Landscape

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Filed under: Art In The Garden, Design, Build,

Local Kensington Photographer Geoffery Agrons has shared some of his beautiful photos of this Fall's  Revealing the Landscape Project.



Geoffery's photos of the student work

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Artist Geoffery Ansel Agrons photographed some of the (In)land student's  Revealing the Landscape intervention/installations.